4 Greek Coins Lot, Poseidon & Trident, Dolphins, Syracuse, Sicily, c 250 BC

Category Coins & Paper Money Coins Ancient

Current price $4.25

Listing type Chinese

Location Bothell, Washington 980** US

Quantity sold 1

Quantity available 1

Bids 3

Seller davis-ancients (7388)

Seller rating 100% positive feedback

Modified Item No

Date c 250 B.C.

Grade Ungraded

Culture Greek

Composition Ancient Greek Bronze

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ANCIENT GREEK COINS
This auction for 3 coins minted in Syracuse, Sicily by one of the "Tyrants of Syracuse" in the 3rd century B.C. They depict Poseidon on the obverse and his trident flanked by dolphins on the reverse.
One of the kings mentioned above was HIERON II, the Greek Sicilian king of Syracuse from 270-215 B.C. As commander of the Syracuse army, he successfully led his forces against the Romans in the First Punic War in 275 B.C. Grateful citizens made him king in 270; however, the Romans prevailed in 263 at which time he made a treaty with Rome and continued as king of eastern Sicily. He remained loyal to Rome for the remaining Punic wars. One of his advisors was the famed Archimedes of Syracuse, whom history calls one of the great mathematicians of all time.
POSEIDON/NEPTUNE
Neptune was the Roman god of water and the sea who had evolved in Roman religion from the earlier Greek god, POSEIDON The Greeks also called him “Earth-Shaker” because they thought he had a role in causing earthquakes. He is usually depicted as an older male deity with curly hair and a beard. His symbols included a trident, fish, dolphin, horse and bull.
These coins were minted in the ancient city of SYRACUSE, SICILY located on the southeastern corner of the island of Sicily. This 2700 year-old region was often one of the major powers in the ancient Mediterranean. It started as city-state during Greek times, founded in about 733 BC by Greek settlers from Corith and Tenaea. but later became part of the Roman Republic and Byzantine Empire. According to the Hercules myth, when on his trip throughout the island of Sicly, he stopped in Syracuse and instructed the natives to sacrifice bulls in the name of Kore (Persephone). The Altar of Zeus, the largest sacrificial altar built in antiquity, was constructed in the third century B.C. It was so massive it could accommodate up to 450 sacrificed bulls at one time.
The city today is called Siracusa with a population of about 125,000. Listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, it features archeological treasures and architecture from Greek, Roman, Byzantine, and Christian periods.
Here are their attributes:
Ancient Greek AE (15-19 mm, 20.42gm total)
OBV: Diademed head of Poseidon left
REV: UPRIGHT TRIDENT HEAD, WITH SCROLLS DECORATION BETWEEN PRONGS; LOTIFORM SHAFT, FLANKED BY DOLPHINS
Syracuse, Sicily mint
AS USUAL, THE PICTURES REALLY DON'T DO JUSTICE. LET ME KNOW IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS.
ABSOLUTE GUARANTEE OF AUTHENTICITY
I have collected ancient coins for many years and have always bought coins from trusted, reputable dealers. The details I describe (emperor, location, legends, etc) are derived from well-known and certified attribution sources. The descriptions are guaranteed accurate as much as the condition of the coin allows. This GUARANTEE OF AUTHENTICITY does not make any claim or estimate of the value or grades of the coin(s).
ALL OF MY ITEMS COME WITH A GUARANTEE OF SATISFACTION , IF ANY ITEM IS NOT AS DESCRIBED IT CAN BE RETURNED IN ITS ORIGINAL CONDITION FOR A REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE.
SHIPPING & HANDLING POLICY
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